On Still Being a Protestant ‘From a Protestant Point of View’: Contra Hauerwas

Reformedish

Today is a special Reformation Day. On this day, Protestants everywhere celebrate the 500th anniversary of the “beginning” of the Reformation—Martin Luther’s nailing of the 95 theses to the door of Wittenberg Castle. Or at least some of us do. Others seem to have trouble remembering what the whole thing was about.

hauerwasTake Stanley Hauerwas. Last week he wrote up something of a rambling rehash of his ambivalence over the whole affair, and a defense (of sorts) for why he remains a Protestant despite the fact he doesn’t, “see the gulf between us and our Catholic brothers and sisters as particularly pronounced.” He has reasons. Like the fact that his wife is ordained, and that he thinks his position as a Protestant allows him to keep Rome honest about its claim to be the “one true Catholic Church.” On his telling, though, most of the reforms the Reformers…

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A Quick Note on Contextual Theology

“Contextual theology” is a term most people have not heard of but it is a very important idea in missions and missiology. Andrew Wilson offers here a quick guide through some of the debates surrounding the idea which yields concise explanation of what the term means.

When Christians Were Atheists

Larry Hurtado's Blog

Early Christians were atheists! At least, that’s how some people of the time viewed them in the earliest centuries, and it’s not difficult to see why. Most importantly, they refused to worship the traditional gods. But also, judged by Roman-era criteria, they didn’t even seem to practice a recognizable form of religion. In the crucial first couple of centuries at least, they had no shrines or temples, no altars or images, and no sacrificial rites or priesthood.[1]

Granted, early Christians were accused of various things. There were the wild claims that Christians engaged in cannibalism and sexual orgies, claims that circulated mainly among the rabble. More sophisticated critics, however, portrayed them as deeply subversive of the social, religious, and political structures of the Roman world. One of the other labels hurled against Christianity was that it was a superstitio, a Latin term that designated bad religion, the kind…

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Podcast: The Value of Controversy

Alastair's Adversaria

Mere Fidelity

I join Derek and Matt for the latest Mere Fidelity episode, on the subject of the value of controversy. We discuss whether controversy is worthwhile and how to go about it well.

You can also follow the podcast on iTunes, or using this RSS feed. Listen to past episodes on Soundcloud and on this page on my blog.

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Honour and Shame in the cultural world of the New Testament

Continue reading “Honour and Shame in the cultural world of the New Testament”

Aryan Jesus

Yesterday in the US there was a parade of White Supremacists which turned violent. While White Supremacy is a very general term for different ideologies held by a collection of very small, largely independent groups in the West, also known as the Alt-Right, they share the common feature of racism, a lot of it being focused against Jewish people as well others. Most Ghanaian Christians have never heard of any of these groups and know very little about antisemitism (hatred of Jewish people) but they are relevant in a larger discussion that does affect Christianity, which is something I hope to explore later on. Unfortunately, western Christianity, the form of Christianity Africa inherited, has played a role in antisemitism. Continue reading “Aryan Jesus”